Corporate access Archive

Oct 01, 2001
Q. My management team are happy to go on roadshows in London but I can't persuade them to spend the time seeing institutions in continental Europe. Does this matter? A.In one sense, the answer has got to be no. The amount of money under management in London (and indeed the UK) dwarfs that in continental Europe. More importantly, fund managers based in the UK tend to run portfolios that are much more heavily weighted in equities than their contine...
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Aug 01, 2001
Broadband is the next big thing, and leading the way - at least in the UK and continental Europe - is Raw Communications. The London-based firm has made its name pumping broadband video to special terminals at financial firms, signing up around 70 top institutions worldwide. Whether you're a brokerage analyst trumpeting your morning recommendations or a CEO with a message to get off your chest, RAWfinancial/broadband delivers high bandwidth video around the world, p...
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May 01, 2001
Corning is a corporate prism. The company refracted an old smokestack industry into a new economy paradigm - or at least the parts of it that work. Set up 150 years ago, the glass manufacturer named for its upstate New York birthplace, was always innovative. It made the bulbs for Edison's electric lighting, and offered a clear view of cuisine and chemistry alike with its invention of Pyrex. But as the last century drew to an end, Corning could see which way th...
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Oct 01, 2000
Most New Yorkers regard their city as the center of the world, and anyone who's strolled through Times Square recently would probably agree. Billboards with neon letters and slogans like Don't be a dummy, research your investments are seen on every corner. It's the mecca of opportunity. Home to top institutional players like JP Morgan Investment, Lehman Brothers and Bankers Trust, the city is rife with opportunities. Mutual fund bigwigs like Salomon Smith Barne...
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Sep 01, 2000
Hot summer days in New York provide the perfect setting for long lunches, and this was one of those days. A light breeze tempered the 80-degree heat and bursts of sunshine peeked through the office towers in Manhattan's downtown core. This was the kind of New York day office workers love. They cut out early for lunch to sit by the nearest fountain and munch bite-sized pieces of sushi or deli sandwiches. Tom Walek, president of Walek & Associates and vice pr...
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Jun 01, 2000
Day one, new job, New York Palace, 5.30 am, early December. I am a mere IR director (not as in board of), only one rung above my former consultant status, about to be baptized by fire into the corporate hierarchy. The CEO, CFO, two senior VPs, three investment bankers and me. This is the roadshow for the last IPO of the 20th century, the largest communications offering of the year, and the second largest telecoms IPO in history. I have convinced my new bosses I belon...
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Dec 01, 1999
It's a media celebrity's game of give and take: sacrifice your privacy to gain public approbation. In this era of business entertainment, where the stock market is a mass medium, and where cable business news is challenging soaps and talk shows for the eyes and ears of the masses, companies themselves and their management become the objects of obsession. Last year Canada's Philip Services Corp forced internet service providers to reveal the identities of indiv...
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Sep 01, 1999
Brad Hammond is on the road so you can stay at home. Monday it's New York with Goldman Sachs; Tuesday, Robertson Stephens in Menlo Park; Wednesday morning, it's BT Alex Brown in Baltimore and then a late flight to Chicago. Typically, he won't be home in Atlanta until the weekend. You may wonder why all the investment banks are demanding his time. It's because people can't travel any faster now than they did a few years ago, but information can. Brad Hammond is the pi...
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Jun 01, 1999
When the California venture firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers reaped its $250m return on Netscape's IPO, tremors shook the world. Wall Street bankers took notice. They had been feeling the tremors grow, but now their seismographs were off the page. Meanwhile, back in California they uncorked the Wine Country's best bubbly. Imagine – the most profitable venture deal in history. They raised a cheer, drank a sip and then went right back to work. Hell, they wer...
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Mar 01, 1999
A lot goes into the party mix when Canada’s biggest company throws its annual analyst conference: financial communications, hospitality and, of course, a healthy measure of showmanship. It’s BCE Inc’s CEO Business Review – the apotheosis of IR, the standard to aspire to. No detail is left unaccounted for, and there’s no room for error. Hundreds of analysts and investors descend on Toronto for the day-long briefing, which last year graduated from caver...
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