Shareholder targeting & ID Archive

Jul 01, 2002
Q. We are headquartered in Europe and listed on the stock exchange of one of the smaller European Union countries. Until recently our major institutional shareholders were all local, but as we have grown many professional investors from abroad have bought in. How can I identify who they are and find out more about them? A.Capital markets intelligence is now a required part of everyday investor relations life. No longer can you rely on your investment ba...
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Mar 01, 2002
Q. We have a large number of individual investors and they provide a useful share price stabilizer at times when institutional shareholders are moving in and out of the stock. How can we encourage them to be long-term holders? A. Many companies have programs designed to retain their retail shareholders. These usually come in the form of a discount on products or services, which can be tricky if you manufacture cruise missiles or provide services that an...
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Mar 01, 2002
What does it take to get new shareholders and keep them loyal? The incentives discussed in this issue's cover story (page 29) may seem like weak substitutes for what investors really want. Like the child who asks for peace on earth instead of toys for Christmas, investors today want the simple things in life - a company that will stay out of chapter 11 for the next little while. Or one that can prevent a rogue employee from losing half the year's profits. Or just one...
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Mar 01, 2002
See Ken. See Ken drive.See Ken drive a Ford.See Ken smile as he says, 'To this day, my car is always a Ford product. I would never dream of owning another car.' Ken is not a fictional character from a TV commercial but a real person who - as his enthusiasm for Ford automobiles may hint - is a longtime shareholder in Ford Motor Company. And one more thing: He also happens to be the head of an association whose members account for roughly $125...
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Feb 01, 2002
These are tough times for investor relations officers. And we're not just talking about IROs at tech companies or dot-coms. In a market correction (dare we call it a bear market?) and in times of national tragedy such as the one we are now living through, even the best companies have trouble being heard over the tumult on Wall Street. For mid-sized and small-cap companies, the challenge to communicate with the investment community can be even more daunting. So...
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Jan 01, 2002
When a huge conglomerate with national roots decides to break into five separate companies, IROs have a lot of ground to cover with shareholders. Such was the case when Canadian Pacific, a company founded in 1881 to build Canada's transcontinental railway, spun-off its five subsidiaries. From the time the reorganization was announced in February 2001 to the actual spin-off at the end of September, CP's IR department was busy communicating the details of the transacti...
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Jul 01, 2001
Both sides of the debate concerning increased disclosure have equally persuasive arguments. On the one hand there is the need to protect commercially sensitive information from competitors. On the other, there is a need to give investors a more thorough understanding of key business drivers - with more data, investors will be able to place a more realistic value on the stock. The continuing debate over financial disclosure also applies to how companies plan to...
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Jul 01, 2001
American television viewers may remember an advertising campaign a few years back starring tennis great Andre Agassi. In the ads, Agassi hawks a Nikon camera with the tagline Image is everything. Well, if Agassi ever loses the zing from his backhand, he may have a future on Wall Street. Thanks to the increasingly-popular perception audit, image appears to be everything in the financial markets these days. Perception audits - otherwise known as investor ...
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May 01, 2001
In the heart of Tokyo's crowded, frantic Shibuya Station where millions of people pass every day, there is a statue of Hachico the loyal dog. The statue commemorates a real-life dog who allegedly met his master here each day after work, and continued to wait nobly for several years after the man had died. Today the statue stands as a national symbol for loyalty, fraternity and dedication - traits Japanese culture holds in highest esteem. These traits have alwa...
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Sep 01, 2000
Congratulations. Your company has just made another brilliant strategic acquisition. You targeted shareholders and implemented a winning communications strategy. The share exchange went down smoothly and the Street loves you. However, one nagging piece of miscellany remains before you can swallow the deal. Oddlotters. While never so rude as to admit it, many corporate secretaries and IR practitioners consider oddlotters pests. These shareholders, often created...
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