Recent articles

Nov 01, 1995
'Cheers' said Hugh, raising his glass. 'Or should that still be Sant at this point?' Everyone on the Paris to London train felt obliged to mark the moment that it entered the tunnel. In time, I suppose, people will become blas about it. But for now travelling under the Channel remains a wonder, even for frequent travellers. Looking out of the window, I pondered the cause of this wonderment. The trains and the control systems might use some of the world's most ...
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Nov 01, 1995
Billed as one of the few drawn-out hostile battles left on Wall Street, Moore Corp's hostile bid for Wallace Computer Services Inc has made a few executives sweat. But at least it's keeping the advisory teams busy. Toronto-based Moore launched its bid for Wallace at the end of July with a $56-a-share cash offer for the Illinois-based business forms producer. Wallace's board rejected the initial offer, supported by the company's shareholders. Now a proxy figh...
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Nov 01, 1995
New York-based IR firm Georgeson & Co has introduced its SynerG shareholder base management software into the UK. Designed in-house, the program draws on proprietary databases and external data feeds to provide current and historical ownership data on your screen. It currently covers 1,200 institutional profiles in the UK, continental Europe and the US, giving the time-starved IRO ready access to investment criteria, ownership trends and voting policies. The syst...
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Nov 01, 1995
New York-based KCSA has been out bagging a number of new investor relations clients over the last month. Nasdaq-listed stocks in the appointments list include Numerex Corp, the alarm transmitting specialists and Palomar Medical Technologies, the cosmetic and medical procedures systems maker. Among Amex companies, KCSA has been retained by MAI Systems, the California-based information systems company and electronic products distributor Emerson Radio Corp. Mov...
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Nov 01, 1995
It's been a busy time for Ludgate Communications in continental Europe of late. First up comes the IPO for Adidas, the German sports goods company, which kicked off on the roadshow trail in late October with stop-offs in Paris, Amsterdam, London and New York among others. Ludgate beat off competition from Dewe Rogerson and Gavin Anderson to secure the financial communications contract on what is expected to be Germany's second largest share offer this yea...
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Oct 01, 1995
'Do you surf the net?' said Tony, staring down at me in the mirror. Now, I know it's a barber's right to choose the subjects for discussion, but cyberspace was not on Tony's usual agenda. Last time, the conversation - or monologue - had revolved more predictably around Marcia Clarke, Rush Limbaugh and George Steinbrenner. I wanted to explain that what I did couldn't really be called surfing; it was more like paddling gingerly in the shallows while wearing a li...
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Oct 01, 1995
News that the activist fund manager Calpers wants to raise its overseas equities holdings from 13 per cent to 20 per cent of its assets could send shivers down the spines of executives in underperforming companies across the globe. And the chill wind of heightened expectation may be felt most in boardrooms across continental Europe. A significant chunk of the Californian fund's extra $6 bn or so is destined for investment in French and German interests (the rest targeted a...
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Oct 01, 1995
If there's one issue in the battle between companies and investors that just won't seem to lie down, it has to be that of executive and director compensation. Some try to discount the importance of high salaries and benefits packages by attributing the hostility they generate to the politics of envy: complaints from those vociferous retail shareholders are all based merely on jealousy, not on rational analyses of their impact on bottom lines. But despite the worldly ...
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Oct 01, 1995
The Asian market has been one of the hardest nuts to crack for global IR consultants. The region is home to some of the world's most renowned family-run companies, which can be almost impossible to persuade of the virtues of IR: often they simply cannot believe that disclosing information to shareholders is in their interest. Indeed, many of Asia's family-controlled empires have yet to be converted to the modern ways of dealing with capital markets: they prefer to sa...
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Oct 01, 1995
If anyone thought that 2,104 Japanese companies holding their shareholder meetings on the same day would lead to a few juicy reports of managements being held to account by irate shareholders, they had better think again. That's not the way things go in corporate Japan, even with a falling stock market. Probably the biggest disturbance on June 29 was to the holiday plans of the Japanese police force. More than 10,000 officers were put on alert to protect companies a...
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